The Bookman Christmas Catalog

The Bookman bookstore owned by Grace David had an amazing 1960 Christmas catalog. Below are a few pages.

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Our collections reveal a few connections to the famed Grace David, who served as the inspiration of Aurora Greenway in Terms of Endearment. We own the Charles Tapley architectural collection, which feature architectural drawings of the Grace and Henry David home. We also have a collection of Larry McMurtry papers. He both briefly attended Rice and taught here.

Online Exhibit: Houston Folk Music Archive

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We’re happy to announce the new online exhibit for the Houston Folk Music Archive. It features a history of the scene, mini-exhibits on musicians, bands, music venues, and others. Each mini-exhibit contains a biography or history, images, and/or an oral history.

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The online exhibit also has a map of music venues where folk musicians played. It even includes a timeline where you can track the folk scene’s rise and fall.

A big thank you to Claudia Middleton, our student archivist, for all of her scanning, metadata work, and for creating the map.

More Folk Music Oral Histories

We have uploaded another batch of oral histories. These will all be included in our upcoming Houston Folk Music Archive online exhibit.

David John Scribner

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He speaks about his life and his time hosting the “Chicken Skin Music” program on KTRU.

Lynn Langham

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The Grammy winner discusses her long career in the music industry and her experiences as a singer-songwriter in Houston, New York, Los Angeles, and Nashville.

Don Sanders

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He talks about his time playing at the most famed folk clubs in Houston.

Architects in the Archives- Charles Tapley (1931-2015)

Charles Tapley /Buffalo Bayou Tapley Tributary

Houston waterways, including Buffalo Bayou, are a continuing topic of conversation in the city, especially in the wake of Hurricane Harvey. I immediately think of Charles Tapley, architect and landscape architect, Adjunct Professor in Architecture at the University of Houston, Rice alumnus, and wonderfully kind person. He was a visionary, a driving force for the thoughtful reclamation and development of Buffalo Bayou.

Everything that has been done in recent years to make the bayou a place that invites people (and accommodates occasional flooding) was imagined in his master plan, the Buffalo Bayou Strategy (1977), developed on a forty-foot-long drawing unrolled on his studio floor.  A digitized version of the Buffalo Bayou Master Plan can be viewed in Rice’s Digital Scholarship Archive here. You can zoom in  for detail and pan across the length of the rendering.

Buffalo Bayou Master Plan rendering (detail) 1977

The detail above is between Waugh and Montrose and Memorial and Allen Parkway.

Tapley was known for his mid-century modern design aesthetic, and for his joyous projects for public spaces such as Tranquility Park and houses of worship in the Houston community. Commitment to sustainability and the use of native plants to support local wildlife and climate were integral to his designs. You can learn more about his work in his papers here.

New HFMA Oral Histories

The Houston Folk Music Archive has been steadily posting new oral histories online. Here are few of the newer ones.

Danny McVey

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He talks about his time doing sound for a variety of performers in the city.

Jack Saunders

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He discusses playing with local bands, joining The Shake Russell Band, his duo with Shake Russell, and his recording studio White Cat.

George Ensle

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He describes how he came to folk music and his recording projects.

Dana Cooper

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He tells about his life growing up in Missouri and his careers in Houston and Nashville.

We’re also working on other oral histories by Don Sanders, Lynn Langham, Isabelle Ganz, Sara Hickman, and Franci Jarrard and Lyse Moore.

 

Primary Source Literacy

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Recently, we taught primary source literacy skills to students in Sophia Hsu’s FWIS 191. Literature and Public Health. The students looked at newspaper clippings, photographs, fliers, and other pertinent documents to get  a sense of how members of the administration, faculty, and students viewed the event. They also heard the voices of some of the major players including Dr. William H. Masterson on his megaphone, Dr. Clark Read speaking his mind, and Bari Kaplan explaining events from a student perspective.

In the class, the students first considered the differences between primary and secondary sources, identified the subjectivity of the archival items on their tables, and extracted information from the items, like key players and power relationships.

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After these exercises, the groups looked at the primary source materials that they will be working on for the semester, which includes a few items from the McGovern Historical Center and the Woodson’s Encyclopédie and the Vince Bell collection.

If you are interested in us doing the same for your course, please do not hesitate to contact us.

Images used: “Rice University students and faculty protesting outdoors during Masterson presidency controversy, wearing “It Can’t Happen Here” signs.” (1969) Rice University: http://hdl.handle.net/1911/75392.

Memorabilia Monday: Gilley’s Bumper Sticker

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This bumper sticker from the early 1980s comes from the Jack Saunders collection, which is currently being processed.

For those not from Pasadena/Houston area, Gilley’s is synonymous with Urban Cowboy the movie based on the Esquire article “The Ballad of the Urban Cowboy.” If you haven’t read about Rice’s connection to the story, you should read this blog post from the Glasscock School of Continuing Studies published a few years ago.

The CAMH at the Woodson

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Merce Cunningham Dance Company performs “Suite for Five” in April 1965 in conjunction with the Contemporary Arts Museum Houston exhibition “Robert Rauschenberg.” Courtesy Contemporary Arts Museum Houston

The Contemporary Arts Museum Houston (CAMH) recently donated their extensive archive to us. For more information, please read the recent Rice News & Media article about the transfer.

We are incredibly excited by this donation and cannot wait to share it with the public after it has processed.