Book Signatures

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Perusing the rare books shelves can reveal a variety of surprises.

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One unassuming volume, Lettres D’Emerance A Lucie by Jeanne-Marie Leprince De Beaumont (1765), has some interesting signatures from Sir William Clayton Bart and C.E. Clayton, Harleyford, 1819. It’s unclear if these are two separate signatures, thought they appear to be in the same hand or E.C. Clayton refers to the Clayton-East-Clayton baronets.

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by William Beechy, 1802

Above is Sir William Clayton, 4th Baronet (1762-1834), who was a member of Parliament for Great Marlow.

How a book from Sir William Clayton / Harleyford Manor wound up in our rare book collection is a bit puzzling.

Image from: http://www.thepeerage.com/p1869.htm

New HFMA Oral Histories

The Houston Folk Music Archive has been steadily posting new oral histories online. Here are few of the newer ones.

Danny McVey

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He talks about his time doing sound for a variety of performers in the city.

Jack Saunders

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He discusses playing with local bands, joining The Shake Russell Band, his duo with Shake Russell, and his recording studio White Cat.

George Ensle

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He describes how he came to folk music and his recording projects.

Dana Cooper

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He tells about his life growing up in Missouri and his careers in Houston and Nashville.

We’re also working on other oral histories by Don Sanders, Lynn Langham, Isabelle Ganz, Sara Hickman, and Franci Jarrard and Lyse Moore.

 

Primary Source Literacy

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Recently, we taught primary source literacy skills to students in Sophia Hsu’s FWIS 191. Literature and Public Health. The students looked at newspaper clippings, photographs, fliers, and other pertinent documents to get  a sense of how members of the administration, faculty, and students viewed the event. They also heard the voices of some of the major players including Dr. William H. Masterson on his megaphone, Dr. Clark Read speaking his mind, and Bari Kaplan explaining events from a student perspective.

In the class, the students first considered the differences between primary and secondary sources, identified the subjectivity of the archival items on their tables, and extracted information from the items, like key players and power relationships.

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After these exercises, the groups looked at the primary source materials that they will be working on for the semester, which includes a few items from the McGovern Historical Center and the Woodson’s Encyclopédie and the Vince Bell collection.

If you are interested in us doing the same for your course, please do not hesitate to contact us.

Images used: “Rice University students and faculty protesting outdoors during Masterson presidency controversy, wearing “It Can’t Happen Here” signs.” (1969) Rice University: http://hdl.handle.net/1911/75392.

Fate Magazine

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Over the past year, we have expanded our collecting focus to include the paranormal. As part of a larger collection from Robert Fuller, we have Fate magazines dating back to 1948. They have incredibly interesting advertisements.

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Everything else seems like an ad found in a paranormal magazine, but the one below doesn’t really fit.

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Memorabilia Monday: Gilley’s Bumper Sticker

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This bumper sticker from the early 1980s comes from the Jack Saunders collection, which is currently being processed.

For those not from Pasadena/Houston area, Gilley’s is synonymous with Urban Cowboy the movie based on the Esquire article “The Ballad of the Urban Cowboy.” If you haven’t read about Rice’s connection to the story, you should read this blog post from the Glasscock School of Continuing Studies published a few years ago.

The CAMH at the Woodson

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Merce Cunningham Dance Company performs “Suite for Five” in April 1965 in conjunction with the Contemporary Arts Museum Houston exhibition “Robert Rauschenberg.” Courtesy Contemporary Arts Museum Houston

The Contemporary Arts Museum Houston (CAMH) recently donated their extensive archive to us. For more information, please read the recent Rice News & Media article about the transfer.

We are incredibly excited by this donation and cannot wait to share it with the public after it has processed.