Tech Thursday: Shark Model

Shark

A favorite of many in the Woodson is our shark model. Based on the plaque, it was sold by The General Biological Supply House in Chicago. It’s part of the series Jewell Models for Biology, which were made by Turtox Products. For those more interested in Turtox, the company did have a newsletter, entitled Turtox News in the 1950s.

Jewell Models for Biology, The General Biological Supply House, Chicago, U.S.A.

Jewell Models for Biology, The General Biological Supply House, Chicago, U.S.A.

Here are some more images of the vicious shark in all its glory.

Shark

Shark

Shark

I would like to think it originally lived in one of the cabinets below with the other impressive models and skulls. If you ever used him for research, please tell us your story.

Biology lab seminar meeting, 1954

Biology lab seminar meeting, 1954

Susanna Centlivre’s The Busie Body, A Comedy

Among our Stockton Axson Collection of 18th Century Drama, are many editions of Susanna Centlivre‘s The Busie Body, A Comedy. Her most successful play was performed for King George I and II and had 40 different editions by 1884.

That fact brings us back to Axson’s collection. The Rice English professor was unable to collect all 40 editions, but he did find 19. While not all of the editions have frontispieces, many do and some even showcase the actors who played the main character, Marplot.

3rd Edition, 1714

3rd edition, 1714

6th edition, 1737

6th edition, 1737

1765, Theatres Royal

T. Lowndes, etc. edition, 1765

Theatre Royal in Covent Garden, 1776

T. Lowndes, etc., edition, 1776

J. Wenman edition, 1777

J. Wenman edition, 1777

W. Oxlade edition, 1777

W. Oxlade edition, 1777

Bell's Characteristical edition, 1782

Bell’s Characteristical edition, 1782

John Bell, British Library, Strand edition, 1791

John Bell, British Library, Strand edition, 1791

John Cumberland edition, 1824

John Cumberland edition, 1824, with an illustration by Robert Cruikshank

Sources used: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Susanna_Centlivre

Memorabilia Monday: Baseball Buddy

Last year, the Woodson acquired the wonderful J.P. Miller papers. This Rice grad wrote the teleplays for Days of Wine and Roses and Playhouse 90, as well as received three Emmy nominations for his work. His collection had been housed for many years in a storage unit. When the family packed his papers, they used various items to fill the boxes. Among his papers were pillows, a few stuffed animals, and this guy.

Constructed by Favorite Things, Inc. in 1977

Constructed by Favorite Things, Inc. in 1977

One of the archivists, Amanda Focke, decided that our little baseball buddy needed some tender loving care. She mended one of his hands, which was falling off. Since his colors are Rice-ish, she decided that she would make him into a piece of Rice memorabilia by adding the “R” to his chest. Now, our buddy sits in the vault.

I hope Coach Wayne Graham approves.

Coach Graham, 1998

Coach Graham, 1998

Hot Air War Balloons

front cover

front cover

Gaston Tissandier‘s Souvenir et Récits d’un Aérostier Militaire de l’Armée de la Loire [Bullets and Balloons: Escape from the Siege of Paris] (1891) is about his escape from Paris when the Prussian forces besieged the city during the Franco-Prussian war. Tissandier didn’t leave via horseback instead he flew away in a hot air balloon. That’s pretty cool.

spine

spine

The book itself is quite beautiful with its detailed cover, spine, and great illustrations. Sadly, while most of the pages are cut properly, some of the uncut pages were ripped.

illustration

illustration

This book comes from our extensive Benjamin Monroe Anderson Collection on the History of Aeronautics. We also have a manuscript collection, which contains model airplanes, posters, scrapbooks, and art.

Memorabilia Monday: Humble Oil Sign

The Woodson recently acquired the porcelain sign above. The donor found it in the field behind Astroworld. After cleaning it up, she realized that it might be something important.

If you know more about this sign, please let us know. It would be great to have more information.

Also, if this post makes you miss the Astrodome, there’s a new digital archive called Astrodome Memories, which has exhibits, a memory wall, and lots of images. Archives in the Houston area have contributed materials to the project.

Tech Thursday: The 1970 Campanile Record

1970 Campaniles on display during Homecoming

1970 Campaniles on display during Homecoming

The creators of the 1970 Campanile looked beyond the typical yearbook layout and instead tried to capture Rice from a different perspective. Items in the box include posters, essays of senior experiences, cartoons, poems, and a record. While most of the items in the box represent Rice visually, the record transmits the sounds of the campus. For those who have not heard it, sides A and B consist of pop music samples with news segments from KTRU and national news.

DMC station

DMC work station

Using the Digital Media Commons‘ (DMC) equipment, I recently digitized the record. I used their Audio-Technica record player and Audacity software. After placing the record on the player, all I had to do was adjust the sound levels, and then press record. It was that easy. The DMC is open to the public and has helpful staff, so feel free to digitize that old record of yours.

Now, let’s move on to the results. Here is a section from side A*.

Here is Walter Cronkite‘s sign off at the end of side B.

If you are not lucky enough to own a 1970 Campanile record and a record player, you can come to the Woodson to listen to the two tracks in their entirety.

*If you feel that this snippet violates your copyright, please let us know and we will happily take it down.

Samuel Johnson’s A Dictionary of the English Language

Johnson's Dictionary, 1755

Johnson’s Dictionary, 1755

Before the Oxford English Dictionary, the English relied on Samuel Johnson‘s two volume work. Published on April 15, 1755, the dictionary was the best of its kind and took Johnson, working solo, nine years to complete.

Title page

Title page

In honor of Library Week, here’s the entry for “librarian” and “library.” Using Shakespeare and other great writers as sentence examples is a really nice touch.

Entries for librarian and library

Entries for “librarian” and “library”

Source used: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/A_Dictionary_of_the_English_Language

Memorabilia Monday: Band Trophy

Engraving reads: "K.P.R.C. Trophy Rice Institute Band Lee Chatham - Director"; On the other side: "Houston Recreation Dept. Band Contest Second Place Class A May 7th 1930"

Engraving reads: “K.P.R.C. Trophy Rice Institute Band Lee Chatham – Director”; On the other side: “Houston Recreation Dept. Band Contest Second Place Class A May 7th 1930″

On May 7th, 1930, the Rice Institute band made up of students and members of the Houston community participated in the annual Harris County Band and Orchestra Contest. Under the direction of Lee Chatham, the band played two marches, “The American Flyer” and “Them Basses,” and the four part suite, “Atlantis.” While they played well, they came in second to the Southern Pacific Railroad. The owls did not leave empty handed, though. They received the K.P.R.C. Trophy shown above.

Rice Institute Band downtown outside Rice Hotel, 1930s

Rice Institute Band downtown outside Rice Hotel, 1930s

 

 

The Love Life of Birds

spine and front cover

spine and front cover

While it seems a rather strange observance, today is DABDay, International Draw a Bird Day. To give you some inspiration, here are some beautiful birds from Carlos Selva Andrade’s Love Life of Birds, which features illustrations by Axel Amuchastegui.

end pages

end pages

page 83

page 83

Here’s a contribution from a member of the Woodson staff.

The semi-official Woodson bird

The semi-official Woodson bird

Memorabilia Monday: Tennis Sweater

Tennis sweater, 1929

Tennis sweater, 1929

This season the Rice Owls tennis teams began using their new facilities, the George R. Brown Tennis Center. Both of the tennis teams are quite strong this year and are ranked within the top 50.

Tennis team wearing their sweaters, 1929

Tennis team wearing their sweaters, 1929

In 1929, the men’s team performed well and won three of their seven meets. The men might have performed a bit better in lighter clothing, though. One piece of their uniform was a heavy wool sweater. I am not sure how they survived playing in a material so thick, itchy, and hot, but here’s proof.

Morris Appell

Morris Appell

The current men’s team should be happy that long pants, long sleeved shirts, and sweaters are a thing of the past.


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