Memorabilia Monday: Christmas Cards from the University President

Holiday cards are no longer printed by the President’s Office, since they are strictly digital. The Woodson has the Rice University Presidents’ Christmas and holiday cards collection, 1914-2008, which has cards from every president except Kenneth Pitzer. The interesting thing about the cards is how they represent the times and focus of each man.

Edgar Odell Lovett card

Edgar Odell Lovett’s card shows extreme restraint.

William Houston card

William V. Houston’s showcases a new building on campus.

Norman Hackerman card

Norman Hackerman’s focuses on the snow of 1973.

George Rupp card

George Rupp’s expandable card (my personal favorite) has a panoramic of Lovett Hall on the back.

Malcolm Gillis card

Malcolm Gillis’s card, like Hackerman’s, highlights Houston’s version of extreme winter weather, an icy day in 1998.

David Leebron card

David Leebron’s features John Outram’s “The Birth of Consciousness” which is located on the Steve and Sue Shaper Ceiling in Anne and Charles Duncan Hall.

Tech Thursdays: Ammeter

Tech Thursday is a new, reoccurring post featuring electronic and mechanical items in the Woodson’s holdings. We’re starting with an unprocessed collection of vintage equipment from the University’s Electrical Engineering Department.

Mil-ammeter, General Electric, 1935

Mil-ammeter, General Electric, 1935

Mil-ammeter, top

Mil-ammeter, top

An Ammeter is used to measure electrical current in a circuit. This one, a Mil-ammeter, was used for measuring smaller currents. The wood housing is still quite beautiful and can be opened by pressing a small button under the leather handle.

ammeter

The DC on the face and side indicate that the device was only compatible with direct current.

Mil-ammeter, close-up

Mil-ammeter, close-up

Mil-ammeter, side left

Mil-ammeter, side-right

If you happen to be familiar with this model and how it was used, please feel free to share in the comments!

Online exhibit features Autry collection

Autry family on Mirror Lake, Yosemite Valley, CaliforniaThe Woodson’s latest online exhibit highlights the lives and times of the James Lockhart Autry family.  “Autry Family from the Alamo to Rice University” describes the journey of 4 generations of the Autry family. Included are digitized letters written by Micajah Autry who travelled west from Tennessee to seek out new opportunities in Texas and joined the Texas Revolution. The letters written by Autry to his wife describe the fighting with Mexico. Micajah Autry would fight and die at the Alamo. For his service, Anson Jones, President of the Republic of Texas presented his widow 1,920 acres in Navarro County, Texas. His grandson, James Lockhart Autry II would come to Texas as a young man to study the law and maintain the land.

James Lockhart Autry II would become an influential lawyer and align himself with the burgeoning oil industry in Texas. He was secretary, director, and general attorney for The Texas Company (now Texaco). His family would become prominent Houstonians and lifelong supporters of Rice University. The exhibit includes photographs of Autry House, the first “student center” at Rice, a community house gifted by the family as a place for all students and faculty to gather.

Autry House, Rice Institute

This digitized material forms part of a larger physical collection accessible at Fondren Library, which includes business papers, correspondence, photographs and memorabilia related to the James Lockhart Autry family of Texas (1875-present) and of North Carolina (1832), Tennessee (1824-1840) and Mississippi (1840-1875). These materials show the life style of a family who moved into Texas and played an important role in developing both the social and economic framework of Houston. Finding aid to the collection is available at: http://library.rice.edu/collections/WRC/finding-aids/manuscripts/0003

Memorabilia Monday: Report Cards

Anna Gilliland Schirmer report card, 1919/1920

Anna Gilliland Schirmer report card, 1919/1920

Finals end on Wednesday. Afterwards students will be checking online to see if their final grades have been posted.

Here are some report cards that are nearly one hundred years old. The scoring is a bit different, though. Students strove for a “1” and never wanted a “5.”

Otto Hugo Eisenlohr report card, 1916/1917

Otto Hugo Eisenlohr report card, 1916/1917

Double Fore-Edge Painting

The Poetical Works of William Cowper, Edited by The Rev. H.F. Cary, A.M., 1839

The Poetical Works of William Cowper, Edited by The Rev. H.F. Cary, A.M., 1839

The fore-edge paintings show six mounted polo players at rest and in action.

Look for more fore-edge paintings in the months to come.

 

Memorabilia Monday: Final Exams

Rice Institute students studying in a room, 1912

Rice Institute students studying in a room, 1912

Wednesday is the start of final exams, so let’s take a look at tests that the men above would have taken.

The tests below date from the 1910s-1920s and cover the economics of railroads and the biological classes of arthropods. Could you pass them?

Mathematics I Exam

Mathematics I Exam

Biology 220 Final Exam, December 21, 1921

Biology 220 Final Exam, December 21, 1921

Economics 200 Exam

Economics 200 Exam

Rice News photo files

Rosalynn Carter with President Jimmy Carter looking at plans for a Habitat for Humanity house. They worked on the project with Rice University and its employees. June 1998. Photograph by Jeff Fitlow.

Rosalynn Carter with President Jimmy Carter looking at plans for a Habitat for Humanity house. They worked on the project with Rice University and its employees. June 1998. Photograph by Jeff Fitlow.

Featuring beautiful photography from Rice University photographers, the Rice News photo files highlight campus events and news about faculty and staff. While we have owned the collection for quite some time, we did not have a proper inventory for it. Our student archival assistant, Ariel Penny, thankfully completed the job.

Tumi Johnson and Mondro Barman working at Coffeehouse, December 1998. Photograph by Jeff Fitlow.

Tumi Johnson and Mondro Barman working at Coffeehouse, December 1998. Photograph by Jeff Fitlow.


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