Taking selfies with Darwin

Last Monday evening, the Woodson hosted 25 undergraduate students for an after-hours visit. Students from Hanszen College one of the residential colleges on campus, examined treasures from the archives. Highlights included: Nicolaus Copernicus’ masterpiece, De Revolutionibus Orbium Coelestium (1566), which marks the dawn of modern science, and dates from the edition which Galileo would have had in his library; Galileo Galilei’s Dialogo suppressed by the Inquisition in 1633; and Isaac Newton’s Philosophia naturalis principia mathematica, from our rich History of Science collection. A first edition of Darwin’s On the Origin of Species published in 1859 was also exhibited.

Students from Hanszen College visit Archives

Students from Hanszen College visit Archives

The students also examined Woodson’s copy of three tragedies without a collective title from the first folio edition of the plays of William Shakespeare, including King Lear, Othello, and Anthony and Cleopatra (1623). The text of King Lear includes a number of alterations and additions in an early 18th century hand.

Students examining History of Science collection

Students examining History of Science collection

It was a great evening and the students enjoyed the opportunity to examine and carefully handle works they have read or heard about in classes and several asked to take selfies with the books to share with friends.

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